Navigation for Sunday Morning

7:10 Wuhan virus is twice as virulent as Ebola 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the flu-like coronavirus a global emergency on Friday after cases spiked more than tenfold in a week. Globe and Mail Beijing correspondent Nathan VanderKlippe is with us from the Chinese capital with all the latest on the virus that has now claimed more than 250 lives. 

A woman cleans a boy's face in Wuhan,  Hubei province. The number of confirmed cases in the new virus outbreak in China reached 5,974 on 29 January.

Photo: AFP

7.17 Hygiene practices, not masks, key to avoiding viruses 

With officials confirming New Zealand's first possible coronavirus case in Auckland, questions are being asked about how we can keep the virus out of the country. Associate Professor Patricia Priest is from the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine at the University of Otago. She joins the show to discuss the best preventive measures. 

Passengers wearing mask walk at quarantine inspection during the time when a flight arrived from Wuhan at Kansai International Airport in Osaka.

Passengers wearing mask walk at quarantine inspection during the time when a flight arrived from Wuhan at Kansai International Airport in Osaka. Photo: AFP

7:22 US correspondent Karen Kasler on the Iowa caucuses 

For more than a century, the Iowa caucuses have been the opening bell of the presidential election season, with the first actual voting taking place in Iowa in the winter before the national election in November. Karen Kasler explains why Iowa gets to go first and why is it given so much weight in the quadrennial presidential contests. 

 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) holds a campaign event at La Poste January 26, 2020 in Perry, Iowa.

Photo: Getty Images/AFP

7:32 'It's time for New Zealand to wake up to its poverty problem' 

Multiple siblings sharing a single school uniform. School kids living with their families in cars. They are stories that sound as though they are from another place but sadly these are first-hand examples of the poverty epidemic in New Zealand. Ricardo Fox is the principal of Mayfair School in Hastings and is at the coalface of the struggle. 

No caption

Photo: 123rf

7.45 Calling Home: Costa Cotsilinis in Athens 

Dannevirke-born Greek New Zealander Costa Cotsilinis wanted to give something back when he was appointed Honorary Consul-General for New Zealand in Greece back in 1991. Twenty nine years later, he is still doing everything to help New Zealanders living and travelling in Greece and promote the Kiwi way of life. 

Costa Cotsilinis is Honorary Consul-General for New Zealand in Greece.

Costa Cotsilinis is Honorary Consul-General for New Zealand in Greece. Photo: Supplied

8:10 Insight: Why prisons should help inmates to be good dads

There are nearly 10,000 New Zealand men in prison and many of them have children, but how often do we actually think about them as fathers? Teresa Cowie has been finding out how dads in prison cope with the separation, learn parenting skills and prepare for fatherhood and playing a role in their family once they are on the outside.

"Bye bye Dadda" a boy reaches for one last goodbye to his father before heading outside the prison walls

"Bye bye Dadda" a boy reaches for one last goodbye to his father before heading outside the prison walls Photo: RNZ / Teresa Cowie

8:37 Organised cybercrime is not your average mafia 

New research from Michigan State University has identified common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year. MSU professor of criminal justice Thomas Holt is co-author of the study

Michigan State University professor of criminal justice Thomas Holt.

Michigan State University professor of criminal justice Thomas Holt. Photo: Michigan State University

9:06 Mediawatch

This week Mediawatch looks at what makes radio the ‘cockroach’ of world mass media. Also: Mediawatch look at the latest developments in the government’s public broadcasting plan, a controversial kick-off for Super Rugby - and the career of the late Gordon McLauchlan. Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Hayden Donnell

Chiefs hooker Samisoni Taukei'aho

Photo: PHOTOSPORT

9:37 3MM: Allan Dick on Dunedin's war against cars 

Three Minutes Max, where New Zealanders share short and sharp opinions. Here's former broadcaster, Allan Dick with his thoughts on the war that is being waged against Dunedin car owners in favour of cyclists. 

Dunedin cycle poles

Dunedin cycle poles Photo: RNZ/ Ian Telfer

9:40 UK correspondent Dominic O'Connell on Brexit 

The United Kingdom will no longer be a member of the European Union (EU) as of this weekend. But while the UK has agreed the terms of its EU departure, both sides still need to decide what their future relationship will look like. BBC Business presenter, New Zealander Dominic O'Connell offers some on-the-ground reaction from London. 

Brexit supporters wave Union flags as they watch the big screen in Parliament Square, venue for the Leave Means Leave Brexit Celebration party in central London.

Brexit supporters wave Union flags as they watch the big screen in Parliament Square, venue for the Leave Means Leave Brexit Celebration party in central London. Photo: AFP

10:04 'We're entering a new phase of earthquakes in New Zealand' 

Back in 2013, there were a number of fairly major quakes that spread across Wellington. This inspired Wellington-based author Matthew Wright to look back at New Zealand's history with earthquakes -- the social, historical and scientific background -- and where we stand with them today. The result is his new book, Living on Shaky Ground: The science and story behind New Zealand's earthquakes

Damage to roads in Greymouth after the 1929 Murchison quake

Damage to roads in Greymouth after the 1929 Murchison quake Photo: Supplied

10.32 My Current Song: Jackie Bristow, Without You 

New Zealand-born, Nashville-based singer-songwriter Jackie Bristow has returned home for a 16-date summer tour. Bristow, who played in Bannockburn, Central Otago last night, joins the show to discuss the tour, the new album she's about to release, and the inspiration behind the Without You single. 

Nashville-based Kiwi singer-songwriter Jackie Bristow.

Nashville-based Kiwi singer-songwriter Jackie Bristow. Photo: Supplied

10.40 The innocent joy of trespassing 

Nick Slater's life changed one night several years ago when he was coaxed - with the help of a little liquid courage - into trespassing in the hope of finding the best view in Ho Chi Minh City. He described it as a 'spiritual experience' and immediately wanted to do it again. He thinks it's a practice that everyone should be indulging in. He explains why. 

Nick Slater is the newsletter editor at Current Affair and a big fan of trespassing.

Nick Slater is the newsletter editor at Current Affair and a big fan of trespassing. Photo: Supplied

11:05 What's behind the rise of the hoarding disorder? 

Clinical hoarding affects up to 6 percent of the world population, twice as many as OCD, yet it is a largely misunderstood disorder. And those numbers are set to increase with the world's population ageing. Professor Randy Frost may know more about the disorder of hoarding than anyone on earth. He joins the show to discuss the rise in hoarding throughout the world. 

Randy Frost is a professor of psychology at Smith College in Northampton, MA.

Randy Frost is a professor of psychology at Smith College in Northampton, MA. Photo: Supplied

11:27 US correspondent Molly Crane-Newman on the Weinstein trial 

Disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein faces two counts of predatory sexual assault, two counts of rape and one count of criminal sexual assault in his New York case. He faces a maximum of life in prison if convicted on the top charge. New York Daily News journalist Molly Crane-Newman is covering the trial. 

Annabella Sciorra tells court of violent rape by Harvey Weinstein

Annabella Sciorra tells court of violent rape by Harvey Weinstein Photo: RNZ / YouTube

11:38 'The only weapons our students have is their education' 

Bethlehem University is a Catholic University in the Holy Land, established in 1973 as a joint venture between the De La Salle order and the Vatican. Its Vice-Chancellor, Brother Peter Bray FSC, a New Zealander, was in the country this week to offer a presentation on what is happening at the University. He stopped by the RNZ studios while he was in Auckland to discuss the university's context in the Holy Land and the challenges it faces. 

Brother Peter Bray in Manger Square, Bethlehem

Brother Peter Bray in Manger Square, Bethlehem Photo: Supplied