Navigation for Sunday Morning

7:10 China correspondent: "The world's most populous country is on hold" 

The outbreak of the coronavirus in China has impacted the world's most populous country in almost every way imaginable, with the City of Beijing announcing on Friday that only 13% of the capital's 30,000 restaurants were open. Canada's Globe and Mail Beijing correspondent Nathan VanderKlippe joins the show with all the latest. 

A monitor shows the Nikkei stock average rate and Shanghai Stock Exchange, SSE, falling in Tokyo on February 3, 2020 afternoon.( The Yomiuri Shimbun )

Photo: Yomiuri/AFP

7:18 Donald Trump's 'bonkers' week in US politics 

It's been yet another big week in US politics, with Donald Trump capping things off with a rambling, vitriolic speech in the wake of his impeachment acquittal. Karen Kasler covers off the impeachment trial, the theatre of the State of the Union speech, and how much damage Iowa has done -- if any -- to the Democrats. 

US President Donald Trump holds up a newspaper that displays a headline "Acquitted"  while speaking about his Senate impeachment trial in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, February 6, 2020.

Photo: AFP

7.30 GP warns another flu pandemic is a certainty 

In the wake of the coronavirus outbreak out of Wuhan, Edinburgh-based GP and writer Dr. Gavin Francis insists we are getting better and better at controlling these things, but he is adamant there will be another flu pandemic in the future. 

No caption

Photo: The Press Collection Alexander Turnull Library - Ref 11-008542-G

7:45 Calling Home: Victoria Hoult in Porto Alegre, Brazil

Victoria Hoult has been living and teaching in Porto Alegre, Brazil, for the past two and a half years. She and partner Ben have immersed themselves in the local community and culture and both are thoroughly impressed with the type of lifestyle that comes with being an educator in Brazil. 

8:10 Insight: How NZ would fare during a world catastrophe

Experts say threats like a catastrophic pandemic or nuclear or biological terrorism are small, but real, and this country should be thinking about how it would cope if international trade was disrupted by a major event. John Gerritsen has been investigating how self-sufficient New Zealand could be in the event of a global disaster.

Produced by Philippa Tolley.

Disaster Preparedness kit

Photo: RNZ / Patrice Allen

8:37 How gardening creates a time warp  

Gardening is more than a relaxing hobby. It's good for your health, whatever age you are. Dr Harriet Gross is a psychology professor and head of the College of Arts at Lincoln University in the UK. Her book is The Psychology of Gardening. She explains why gardening is so good for you. 

Senior woman with gardening tool working in her backyard garden.

Photo: 123RF

9:06 Mediawatch

Produced and presented by Colin Peacock and Hayden Donnell

This week Mediawatch talks to the broadcasting minister after he lifted the lid a little on his plan for public broadcasting. Also: a controversial shake-up of RNZ’s music - and mixed messages in the media about the dangers of coronavirus. 

Broadcasting minister Kris Faafoi speaking at Christchurch Broadcasting School on Friday.

Broadcasting minister Kris Faafoi speaking at Christchurch Broadcasting School on Friday. Photo: scre

9:37 The high-flying Kiwi behind the US adult study hall startup 

Would you pay someone US$40 to keep you focused on work? It turns out that plenty of people are willing to do so. New Zealander Nodira Khoussainova is the co-founder and CEO of Focused, a Silicon Valley startup that helps people accomplish undistracted work for a couple of hours in a study hall-type setting.

New Zealander Nodira Khoussainova.

New Zealander Nodira Khoussainova. Photo: Supplied

10:04 William Gibson: Why our 'now' is getting shorter and shorter 

William Gibson, arguably the world's most influential living science-fiction writer, has imagined the near future more convincingly than anyone else for four decades now. He was also the first person to coin the term 'cyberspace' in a novel. Gibson is back with his latest thriller, Agency, a book with both feet placed firmly in the future that will leave readers with plenty to chew over. 

Author William Gibson.

Author William Gibson. Photo: Supplied

10:25 How melodic alarms could reduce morning grogginess

The sounds you wake up to could be affecting how groggy and clumsy you are in the morning, according to new research. RMIT University doctoral researcher Stuart McFarlane was lead author of the study, which found that melodic alarms could improve alertness levels. 

No caption

Photo: Pixabay

10:40 My Current Song: Blind Boy Paxton, Trying to Make One Hundred 

American blues extraordinaire Jerron 'Blind Boy' Paxton is currently in the country for an eight-date visit, making his triumphant return to New Zealand after a string of sold-out shows here two years ago. The Watts-born musician joins the show to discuss his tour -- which included a gig in Wellington last night -- and the inspiration behind the closing track from his album, Recorded Music For Your Entertainment -- Trying to Make One Hundred.

Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton

Photo: RNZ / Claire Eastham-Farrelly

10:50 Beer can helps reunite woman with her dog after three years 

When Monica Mathis' dog Hazel disappeared from her yard in 2017 she tried everything to find her beloved pet again, but to no avail. Three years later, thanks to the surprising intervention of a beer can, she was reunited with her terrier mix, who had somehow managed to travel more than 1,000 miles from home.    

Hazel the Dog was reunited with owner Monica Mathis after three years and a journey that spanned more than 1000 miles.

Hazel the Dog was reunited with owner Monica Mathis after three years and a journey that spanned more than 1000 miles. Photo: Monica Mathis

11:05 Kate Murphy: You're Not Listening

Self-improvement guru Dale Carnegie always said listening was the key to getting ahead in life. But it seems we're actually listening to each other less than ever. Journalist Kate Murphy takes a closer look at the art of listening in her new book, You're Not Listening: What You're Missing and Why It Matters

Author Kate Murphy

Author Kate Murphy Photo: Supplied

11:30 World's longest race stretches 3,100 miles around single NYC block 

The Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race spans across 52 days around one New York City block. The race is almost 5000 kilometres in total and competitors can expect to go through 20 pairs of shoes while only sleeping an average of five hours a night. Sanjay Rawal is the director of the new film that examines the race, 3100: Run and Become

The Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race spans across 52 days around one New York City block.

The Self-Transcendence 3100 Mile Race spans across 52 days around one New York City block. Photo: Supplied