09:05 Recreational boaties still need to heed safety warning

Maritime New Zealand is calling for a national law over the wearing of lifejackets.

Photo: PHOTO NZ

New research shows recreational boaties are improving their attitudes to safety, but many are still not wearing lifejackets and people are still drinking alcohol on the water. 19 boaties died last year, with the vast majority of deaths happening after Labour Weekend. Of those 19 deaths, 18 were men and 14 of them were aged over 40 years old. Maritime NZ says the research on attitudes to water safety is encouraging but more work is still needed to lower the number of deaths. Maritime NZ's Shayrn Forsyth joins Kathryn to discuss.

09:25 What it will take to meet climate change obligations?

This satellite image shows three storms in the Atlantic: Hurricane Irma, Tropical Storm Jose, and Tropical Storm Katia, on September 8th.

This satellite image shows three storms in the Atlantic: Hurricane Irma, Tropical Storm Jose, and Tropical Storm Katia, on September 8th. Photo: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

As New Zealand considers its climate obligations, what policy is needed  to deliver a meaningful result ?  The Government's flagship climate change legislation is scheduled to become law next year, and will set New Zealand's long-term emissions goal as well as establish an independent Climate Change Commission. The UK established a Climate Change Act a decade ago. Since then, the UK has cut its overall emissions by 43 percent from 1990 even though its economy has grown by 70 per cent from that base year. Chris Stark, is the Chief Executive of the UK Committee on Climate Change who has been in New Zealand to address Auckland's Climate Change and Business conference.

09:30 Has Taupo's super volcano been lying about its age?  

RNZ

This graph shows all of the ages obtained for the Taupo first millenium eruption, sorted by age, plotted on a digital model of the North Island of New Zealand. Lake Taupo is the caldera from which the eruption occurred. The oldest ages for the eruption are clustered around Lake Taupo, and older ages are located further from the volcano. We interpret this pattern as being caused by contamination of red areas with volcanic carbon dioxide. Photo: Brendan Duffy, University of Melbourne

The dating of many of the world's prehistoric eruptions, including Taupo's super volcano - may be wrong according to new University of Canterbury research. The study presents evidence that the devastating Hatepe eruption, which buried the entire North Island in debris, likely happened between 40 years and 200 years later than was previously thought. If that's the case it will could have implications for future forecasting methods and even our current understanding of the association between large eruptions and changes in Earth's climate. Kathryn Ryan talks to the study's lead author UC Adjunct Professor Richard Holdaway, from the School of Biological Sciences in Christchurch.

This conceptual image shows how gas from the triggering event, decades before the eruption, works its way into the groundwater system and is eventually incorporated in the wood of the trees that we date.

This conceptual image shows how gas from the triggering event, decades before the eruption, works its way into the groundwater system and is eventually incorporated in the wood of the trees that we date. Photo: Brendan Duffy, University of Melbourne

09:45 Has a Brexit divorce deal been clinched?

Europe correspondent, Seamus Kearney takes us through the conflicting reports out of Brussels about whether a breakthrough had been made in crunch Brexit talks between UK and EU negotiators. Also in Germany, a blow to Angela Merkel as a sister party in Bavaria suffers massive losses at the polls.

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Photo: AFP

10:05 Pic Picot: The Peanut Butter Man

Pic Picot outside Pic's Peanut Butter Factory

Pic Picot outside Pic's Peanut Butter Factory Photo: supplied

Nelson's peanut butter man, Pic Picot, has taken the world of spreads by storm. In 11 years, he has gone from making 200 jars in his garage with a concrete mixer to building a multi million dollar factory in Nelson, employing dozens of locals and squashing thousands of tonnes of peanuts into jars. Pic joins Kathryn to talk about a very simple idea that has taken on a life of its own and the freedom that comes with trusting people.

The team at Pic's Peanut Butter

The team at Pic's Peanut Butter Photo: © 2018 Oliver Weber

10:35 NZ Books review - Whisper of a Crow's Wing by Majella Cullinane

Harry Ricketts from quarterly review periodical New Zealand Books, reviews Whisper of a Crow's Wing by Majella Cullinane, which is published by Otago University Press.

10:45 The Reading

Singing Home the Whale by Mandy Hager read by Simon Leary and  Alex Greig. Part 11.

11:05 Political commentary with Mills & Sherson

Stephen Mills and Trish Sherson talk to Kathryn about the implications of the Government's large surplus, the pluses and the minuses. Also the Prime Minister's targeting of petrol companies over hiked fuel prices.

Petrol prices continue to climb around the country.

Photo: RNZ / Rebekah Parsons-King

Stephen Mills is the executive director of UMR Research and former political adviser to two Labour governments and Trish Sherson is from corporate affairs firm Sherson Willis, and a former ACT press secretary.
 

11:30 Artisan sea salt from the Hauraki Gulf 

Buckets of water from Auckland's Hauraki Gulf are being processed and refined into artisan sea salt. Landscape gardener, Greg Beattie was looking for an extra challenge, and his one man band venture Hauraki Salt Company is now producing flake sea salt. He talks to Kathryn about what is involved in turning sea water into gourmet salt flakes.

11:45 Uber, E-bikes and E-Scooters

Bill McKay looks at the increasing competition for our asphalt. E-bikes, electric scooters and other urban transport options, including Uber, hiring cars by the hour and bike rentals are all vying for space on the street and the footpath.

Traffic backed up on State Highway 1, near Warkworth.

Photo: RNZ / Eva Corlett

Bill McKay is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of Auckland.

Music played in this show

Artist: Leon Bridges
Track: Bad Bad News
Time played: 10.35

Artist: Tony Bennett and Diana Krall
Track: Fascinating Rhythm
Time played: 10:43

Artist: Connan Mockasin
Track: Con Conn was impatient
Time played: 11.34