1 Oct 2014

Trout season opens with 1080 warning

12:02 pm on 1 October 2014

The Department of Conservation says trout anglers can avoid eating fish caught in catchments where aerial 1080 drops have occurred if they have concerns.

The fishing season begins nationwide today.

Trout anglers are being advised that their catch may contain 1080 poison.

Trout anglers are being advised that their catch may contain 1080 poison. Photo: PHOTO NZ

Research commissioned by the Department of Conservation has revealed trout take small amounts of 1080 into their flesh after eating mice poisoned by the toxin.

But, director-general Lou Sanson said although the levels found so far have exceeded the standards set by the Food Standards Guideline, the risk to humans is very low.

He said concerned people can take a 'zero risk' approach by not eating fish caught in catchments where aerial 1080 drops have occurred.

Fish & Game meanwhile said it is taking a responsible approach by warning anglers about possible 1080 contamination.

It is advising anglers not to eat fish caught in areas where the Department of Conservation has been dropping the poison, despite DoC maintaining the risk is incredibly low.

Chairperson of Fish & Game Lindsay Lyons said it is just being cautious.

"We haven't got the science really behind it yet, we just don't know, but I think as Fish & Game we've got to take a responsible approach to it. There could be an issue, we just don't know at this present point in time."

Mr Lyons said he does not believe the warning will put people off going trout fishing.

DoC is posting maps showing current 1080 operations on its website

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