Navigation for Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan for Monday 3 September 2018

Short Story Club

This Thursday we discuss Monster by Tina Makereti  

And our giveaway book for the writer of the best email is her book The Imaginary Lives of James Poneke    

Jesse@rnz.co.nz

1:10 Rising NZ Opera star, Julien Van Mallearts performs live

New Zealander,Julien Van Mallearts is a multi award winning opera singer who has performed around the world, including for the Royal Opera and Royal Ballet in London.

He's back in New Zealand for New Zealand Opera's La bohème and joins us in the studio to perform a song and tell us about his career so far.

NZ Opera Singer, Julien Van Mallearts

NZ Opera Singer, Julien Van Mallearts Photo: Supplied/NZ Opera

1:15 What are business confidence surveys and what do they mean?

Business confidence has been in the news a lot recently, after falling to its lowest level since the Global Financial Crisis.

But what are these surveys? Who do they survey, and how, and what do they actually mean?

Cameron Bagrie was the chief economist at ANZ Bank for 11 years before starting up his own business, and he joins us to answer a few of these questions.

Business confidence is at its lowest point since the Global Financial Crisis

Business confidence is at its lowest point since the Global Financial Crisis Photo: ANZ Bank

1:25 Hollywood mediator Lee Jay Berman

Lee Jay Berman

Lee Jay Berman Photo: Supplied

The professional lives of high-powered celebrities are rife with jealousy, conflict and planet-sized egos.

Lee Jay Berman is a Hollywood mediator who talks bands out of breaking up, gets actresses out of ill-advised record deals and brokers sit-downs between luminaries who can't stand the sight of one another.

He's in New Zealand for an abritrators' and mediators' conference and joins us from Wellington.

1:35 Tuai paintings on display in London

200 years ago, the young Ngare Raumati chief Tuai left the Bay of Islands for an epic trip around the UK and Europe.

While travelling, the multi-talented Tuai drew a number of artworks - three of which are going on display at the Royal Academy of Arts' Oceania exhibition later this month.

Professor Alison Jones from Auckland University is one of the authors of the Ockham Award-winning book Tuai: A Traveller in Two Worlds, and joins us to talk a bit more about this remarkable man.

Drawing of waka, among five by Tūai of Ngāre Raumati and Titeree from Rangihaua which will be loaned to the Royal Academy of Arts in London.

Photo: Sir George Grey Special Collections / Auckland Libraries / GNZ MMS147 drawings

1:40 Great album

2:10 Television Critic Briar Wyatt

Palmerston North poet, Paula Harris

Palmerston North poet, Paula Harris Photo: supplied

2:20 Palmerston North poet wins US poetry prize

Palmerston North poet Paula Harris recently won the Janet B. McCabe Poetry Prize, a US poetry prize organised by literary journal Ruminate.

She joins us to read part of her winning poem, you will dig me from the earth with your bare hands, in order to resurrect me.

2:30 A cult from the blue - Ros Hodgkins talks about cults

When we hear about cults it's normally for bad reasons ... think the Jonestown Massacre, the Heaven's Gate cult, and so on.

But there are lots more orthodox groups that are considered cults which have their roots in conventional mainstream religions.

Ros Hodgkins is a founding member and the acting president of the Cult Information and Family Support network, and joins us from New South Wales.

Ros Hodgkins (right) with her daughter Emma Kipps. Ros is a founding member and the acting president of the Cult Information and Family Support network

Ros Hodgkins (right) with her daughter Emma Kipps. Ros is a founding member and the acting president of the Cult Information and Family Support network Photo: Supplied

3:05 Review of the Pink Concert in Dunedin

Dunedin musician Ashleigh Nicholls joins us to talk about the Pink concert at Forsyth Barr stadium on Saturday night

3:10 The stories behind NZ's historic pubs

Back in 1894 New Zealand had 1,719 pubs - serving a population of just over 700 thousand.  Most of those pubs are long gone, but there are still quite a few historic hotels up and down the country.

Travel writer Peter Janssen has explored 174 of the best of them for his book, New Zealand Pubs, he takes us back to the days of sawdust floors, dog fights, and men only bars and tells us why so many old pubs seem to have a resident ghost.

3:35 Voices

3:45 The Pre-Panel Story of the Day and One Quick Question

4:05 The Panel with Stephen Franks and Claire Murdoch