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Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan for Friday 6 July 2018

CRITTER OF THE WEEK T-SHIRTS!

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Photo: RNZ/Liminal/DoC

We wanted everyone to be able to celebrate the less attractive critters of New Zealand, so we've made some t-shirts. The illustration is by the amazing Giselle Clarkson with the science advice of Mike Dickison and Nicola Toki, DOC's endangered species ambassador.

To order a t-shirt please click here.

1:10 The Uncools live in studio

The second of the highly commended acts in our Battle of the Cover Bands competition perform live from our Wellington Studio.

They are the Uncools, a group of veteran musicians who play many songs from the Flying Nun catalogue.

The Uncools

The Uncools Photo: supplied

1:15 How a fixed mindset is making you fragile

The participation trophy - some people celebrate them, others think getting an award simply for showing up gives the wrong message. 

Though it may sound mean-spirited, research suggests that view may have some truth. Constant adulation doesn't help children, or adults, in the long run. 

Professor Jill Klein, from the University of Melbourne, has found only celebrating successes, and not failure, can lead to  a fixed mindset. 

Jill joins us to explain what that means and why it's a problem.

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Photo: Flickr

1:25 Unsung heroes of New Zealand's suffrage movement 

125 years since women in New Zealand were the first in the world to win the right to vote, an Auckland museum exhibition is taking the opportunity to highlight some of the unsung heroes of the suffrage movement.

The Are We There Yet exhibition also pays tribute to other women who've advanced women's equality in Aotearoa during that century and a quarter.

One of the first Maori suffragists Meri Te Tai Mangakahia is prominentely displayed to recognise the enormous contribution she made to the suffrage movement and more.

Well ahead of her time, Meri Te Tai Mangakahia wanted more than the right to vote, she wanted women represented in Parliament to be part of the decision making.  

Her great grand niece Emma Frost is with me now to tell me about her ancestor's achievements.

1:35 Why we need places to hang out in New Zealand cities

If you've ever been overseas, to Asia or Europe, you'll notice many sidewalk and parks filled with people, often elderly talking and laughing or even playing games. 

An American sociologist Ray Oldenburg labelled these places back in 1970s, calling them "third palces". A public place to relax outside of your home and work. 

In New Zealand though, there are very few of these places in our cities. We have beautiful outdoors, sure, but where can we go to hang out that doesn't cost anything? 

New Zealand Geographic editor Rebekah White has written a piece about this and joins us now to explain it a bit more.

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Photo: Pxhere

1:40 Great album Brown Sugar by D'Angelo

2:10 Film Review with Richard Swainson

Richard discusses Sicario: Day of the Soldado and Edie

2:20 NZ Live: Openside

Auckland four-piece Openside will be treating us to a full-force, energetic set of emo-pop.They're coming to the end of their tour and tell us when they play on RNZ National today it'll be just like being there.

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Photo: Andre Kong

3:10 Food: beetroot and carrot fritters

Lauraine Jacobs shares another simple and healthy recipe - today, Beetroot and Carrot fritters with a mint, lime and yoghurt dressing.

Beetroot and Carrot Fritters with mint lime and yoghurt dressing

Beetroot and Carrot Fritters with mint lime and yoghurt dressing Photo: Liz Clarkson Photography 2015.

3:20 Talk the Walk: the old ghost road

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Photo: https://oldghostroad.org.nz

Regular tramper Linda Cole tells us about walking the Old Ghost Road, an 85 kilometre former miners road  connecting the old dray road in the Lyell (Upper Buller Gorge) to the Mokihinui River in the north.

The winds through valleys, across mountain tops and down river gorges and is suitable for trampers with a reasonable level of backcountry skills and experience.

It can also be mountainbiked.

Linda also regularly takes groups on day tramps around the Auckland region and has done many walks throughout New Zealand.

3:25 Critter of the Week The Hagfish

Hagfish have been around for 300 million years, changing very little. They release slime as a defence mechanism, and if you put one in a bucket, it fills up with snot! The reason for the slime is that they use it to choke the gills of their would-be predators.

CRITTER OF THE WEEK T-SHIRTS!

No caption

Photo: RNZ/Liminal/DoC

We wanted everyone to be able to celebrate the less attractive critters of New Zealand, so we've made some t-shirts. The illustration is by the amazing Giselle Clarkson with the science advice of Mike Dickison and Nicola Toki, DOC's endangered species ambassador.

To order a t-shirt please click here.

3:45 The Pre-Panel Story of the Day and One Quick Question

4:05 The Panel with David Cormack and Heather Roy