E5: Khadija

From Widows of Shuhada, 6:00 am on 12 March 2020

Apart from the grief and loss the Widows of Shuhada feel, they're also grappling with more practical challenges of life without their husbands.

In this episode, the women discuss the gender roles within Islam and how that's impacting their healing journey.

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It has been two years since Neha and Omar Faruk were married in Bangladesh. For her it is almost unbearable to re-visit what looked like an incredible day.

Photo: Photo / Janneth Gil

It has been two years since Neha and Omar Faruk were married in Bangladesh. For her it is almost unbearable to re-visit what looked like an incredible day.

After receiving permanent residency for herself and baby Noor, Neha has moved to a place of their own.

Photo: Photo / Janneth Gil

After receiving permanent residency for herself and baby Noor, Neha has moved to a place of their own.

Atta, Farah, and Aya, just before Atta's death.

Photo: Photo / Farah Talal

Atta, Farah, and Aya, just before Atta's death. Farah says "I think what made our relationship very special is that we were never competing against each other - we were trying to complete each other and if you achieve that, you will achieve a happy family."

Zekeriya and Hamimah on their wedding day in 2008. Hamimah says, "We've lost our imam, our leader, our entertainer, our very very handyman, our favourite chef."

Photo: Photo / Janneth Gil

 

Zekeriya and Hamimah on their wedding day in 2008. Hamimah says, "We've lost our imam, our leader, our entertainer, our very very handyman, our favourite chef."

Hamimah's two sons help out with the chores in their Singapore apartment.

Photo: Photo / Hamimah Tuyan

Hamimah's two sons help out with the chores in their Singapore apartment. Hamimah laughs at herself that she still speaks about Zekeriya in the present tense, saying, "He cooks, I clean the dishes. If I cook, he automatically cleans the dishes. He puts the clothes in the laundry, I'll hang it up to dry. He takes it down, I'll fold it up. You know? So, we are a tag team."

Asha, Interpreter Qaali Mohammed, and Muhubo.

Photo: Photo / Janneth Gil

Asha, Interpreter Qaali Mohammed, and Muhubo. Some people think that wearing a hijab is a symbol of women's oppression, but Muslim women say they cover their head and neck out of respect for their Creator and themselves.

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Plains FM

Plains FM Photo: Plains FM

Widows of Shuhada is Produced by Community Access Radio Plains FM for RNZ and follows four Muslim women widowed by the Christchurch mosque attacks who share their journeys through grief and take steps towards a different life.

| Twitter: @plainsfm |

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