Navigation for Waitangi Day 2021

Waitangi Day 2021 for Thursday 6 February 2020

Julian Wilcox and Shannon Haunui Thompson

Julian Wilcox and Shannon Haunui Thompson Photo: RNZ

The future

Season Mary Downs and Alana Thomas talk about aspirations for 2040.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern holding hands with Titewhai Harawira as they are welcomed on to the Waitangi Treaty grounds.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern holding hands with Titewhai Harawira as they are welcomed on to the Waitangi Treaty grounds. Photo: RNZ / Eden Fusituá

Waihoroi Shortland

Nau mai e taku manu Piki mai e taku manu He manu aha ka tau? Kuaka marangaranga ki te tahuna Korimako pai ki kootaatara Tiwaiwaka i kutia e te mate He kotuku rerenga tahi Nau mai i runga i te komuri aroha I te ata hapara I te kohuretanga o te tai awatea

From 2022 New Zealand history will be taught in all schools

From 2022 New Zealand history will be taught in all schools and kura. History lessons are expected to include the arrival of Maori, early colonisation, the Treaty of Waitangi, immigration to New Zealand, and the evolving identity of the country. Dr Aroha Harris says there are many things to consider as the country gets ready for compulsory history in schools.

Aroha Harris

Aroha Harris Photo: RNZ / Laura Bootham

Ihumatao Kaitiaki

The kaitiaki of Ihumatao have been protecting their whenua for over three years now and just over six months ago, they were issued with an eviction notice, which caused a ground swell of support from around the country for the land to be returned to mana whenua. The land is currently owned by Fletcher Enterprises but discussions have been had with the Kiingitanga, SOUL and the Government for its return. Mana whenua and members of SOUL - Save Our Unique Landscape - Qiane Matata-Sipu and Haki Wilson spoke with Shannon Haunui-Thomspson.

Qiane Matata-Sipu, Kiingi Tūheitia and Pania Newton.

Photo: RNZ / Eden Fusituá

RNZ Pacific's Koro Vaka'uta

We've been discussing what Aotearoa may look like in twenty years time when we commemorate the 200th anniversary of the signing of Te Tiriti. Where do our Pasifika whanau weave into that fabric? Do they see themselves as Treaty partners? As RNZ Pacific's Koro Vaka'uta discovered, the shape of the future is intrinsically tied to our shared past.

Top row (L-R): India Logan-Riley, Nakia Randle, Nevada Huaki-Foote
Bottom row (L-R): Kaeden Watts, Kahu Kutia, Hana Teipo, Annie Te One

Top row (L-R): India Logan-Riley, Nakia Randle, Nevada Huaki-Foote Bottom row (L-R): Kaeden Watts, Kahu Kutia, Hana Teipo, Annie Te One Photo: Trinity Thompson-Browne

Te Ara Whiti Minister, Kelvin Davis

The Government's words at Waitangi on creating space to hold meaningful conversaions with Maori, and to encourage all New Zealanders to cross the bridge in to the Maori World, requires leadership in action, much of which will rest with Te Ara Whiti Minister, Kelvin Davis. He spoke with Julian Wilcox.

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Photo: RNZ / Patrice Allen

Waitangi Day in the rohe: Tamaki Makarau

Youth Affairs reporter Katie Doyle is at Waitangi celebrations at Hoani Waititi in Manukau, South Auckland. Ngati Whatua are hosting an event at Okahu Bay in Orakei and there are also celebrations at West Auckland - Waitangi at Waititi.

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Photo: Katie Doyle

Maori disproportionately hit by climate change

The Iwi Chairs Forum Climate Change Leaders Group, with Mike Smith at its help, recently launched a climate change case against several New Zealand major companies. Our panel looks at how Maori vulnerability and susceptibility to the effects of climate change can be mitigated, and what work is being done by Maori to make that happen. Mike Smith is spokesperson of the Iwi Chairs Forum Climate Change Leaders Group, Mere Mangu is chair of Te Runanga o Ngapuhi and Kera Sherwood O Regan, from Ngai Tahu is a human rights advocate and climate change campaigner.

homeless car

homeless car Photo: RNZ

Where tangata whenua meets ethnic minorities

Anjum Rahman from the Islamic Women's Council on why increased engagement between ethnic and religious minorities and tangata whenua is important. As the demographics of NZ change, understanding the country's history is crucial for all communities, she says.

Anjum Rahman says the government should stop "fear mongering"

Anjum Rahman says the government should stop "fear mongering" Photo: Supplied

Correction: This page previously said Anjum Rahman was calling for Maori language providers to be more welcoming to ethnic religious minorities after some people of ethnic minorities were refused entry to te reo courses because they were not Māori. This was an inaccurate reflection of what she said and we apologise for the incorrect interpretation.

How rangitahi see Aotearoa in 20 years

The year 2040 will mark 200 years since the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. It might seem like a long way off, but many rangatahi are already looking ahead, campaigning for climate change, revitalising te reo Maori and joining political movements, and monitoring how our MPs and PMs are performing. But what do they really think Aotearoa will look like in twenty years? Te Aniwa Hurihanganui visited Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Wairarapa in Masterton to find out

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Photo: Te Aniwa Hurihangaui

The political forum at Te Tii Marae

RNZ's Maori news director, Mani Dunlop has been listening to the the tutohetohe or debate held at the political forum tent at Te Tii Marae - also known as the lower marae

Once the home of all the political talks, Te Tii Marae lost the main event to the more neutral upper marae at the Treaty Grounds a few years ago, but in a few days time it will be a hive of activity for other political panels and debates.

Photo: RNZ / Jo Moir

Waitangi from the Rohe: Dunedin

All around Aotearoa today are commemoration events, celebrating, commemorating, reflecting on who we are, and pondering our shared future. In Te Waipounamu, Ngai Tahu holds an annual Waitangi Day Festival in its takiwaa, and this year they are at the majestic Otaakou Marae, on the Otaakou Peninsula, in Dunedin. Edward Ellison is kaumatua of Ngai Tahu, and esteemed elder of Otakou Marae

Will voters welcome the Maori Party back?

Ousted at the last election, the Maori Party will seeking to get back into Parliament in September. The party hit its high point back in 2008 when it won five of the seven Maori seats, but lost seats each following election... until Labour swept the Maori seats in 2017, which spelled the end of Te Ururoa Flavell and Marama Fox's time in the House. In their absence have voters reconsidered their impact on New Zealand politics, and will they welcome them back? Che Wilson is a co-president of the Maori Party.

Che Wilson nō Ngāti Rangi, Te Atihaunui a Papārangi.

Che Wilson nō Ngāti Rangi, Te Atihaunui a Papārangi. Photo: RNZ/Justine Murray

ACT shares iwi leaders education aspirations

National's potential coalition partner ACT says they agree with the iwi leaders about self-determination and sovereignty, when it comes to things like education. David Seymour has been to Waitangi several times since he became an MP.

ACT Party leader David Seymour speaks to media ahead of the committee stage for his End of Life Choice bill.

ACT Party leader David Seymour speaks to media ahead of the committee stage for his End of Life Choice bill. Photo: VNP / Daniela Maoate-Cox

Govt has failed in its 'year of delivery' Bridges

The Government's record on delivering for Maori, was called into question by Simon Bridges during his speech at Waitangi. The leader of the National Party said the so-called "year of delivery" had failed to produce results. We ask him to characterise his leadership and approach to designing policy.

Simon Bridges at Waitangi 4 February

Photo: RNZ / Simon Rogers

Zero Carbon Act start of addressing climate issues

Green Party co-leader, Marama Davidson says the Zero Carbon Act is the foundation of how progress the country is making to resolve big climate change issues and looks ahead to what the Greens' priorities are as we head into the future

Green MP Golriz Ghahraman and Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson serving up breakfast.

Green MP Golriz Ghahraman and Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson serving up breakfast. Photo: RNZ/Eden Fusitu'a

Peters calls for Māori women to lead children's aspirations

Winston Peters says he wants to see Maori parents, especially mothers encourage their children to be heroes, whether it's in sport, music or education. Mr Peters says it's his hope that Maori will experience equality with Pakeha much sooner than 2040. But he says equity is far harder to deliver, but it will be easier if more rangitahi are encouraged to aim for the top.

Foreign Affairs Minister Winston Peters at Waitangi 4 February

Photo: RNZ / Simon Rogers

Ardern calls for efforts to get the basics right for Maori

The Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern says the Government must address housing and child poverty before it can begin resolving wider aspirations for Maori, but she says she also wants New Zealand history taught in schools and for more children to be learning Te Reo Maori. Ms Ardern says her Government has been focused on those issues in tandem in the past two years.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern with baby Neve at Waitangi.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern with baby Neve at Waitangi. Photo: RNZ/Simon Rogers