7 Jul 2020

Climate change seen as biggest human rights threat to Pacific

From , 6:01 am on 7 July 2020

About 200 human rights workers in the Pacific have called for more research into how climate change is affecting people's human rights.

That's one of the findings of a new study into the rights situation across the Pacific, by the Human Rights Measurement Initiative.

In its newly released data, the group ranked how well countries are performing in several rights areas - such as access to health and education, political rights, and several others.

The iniative's co-founder, K Chad Clay, says the rankings were made through the assessments of more than 200 human rights workers around the Pacific.

But the biggest threat? They all said the climate crisis and indigenous sovereignty.

Jamie Tahana started by asking Dr Clay, why a new data set is needed.

Atoll nations are seeing an increased frequency in ocean inundations during high tides and storms. In this 2016 file photo of Majuro Atoll, a photographer stands ankle deep in water as ocean water floods over the island and onto the main road in the foreground.

Atoll nations are seeing an increased frequency in ocean inundations during high tides and storms. In this 2016 file photo of Majuro Atoll, a photographer stands ankle deep in water as ocean water floods over the island and onto the main road in the foreground. Photo: Hilary Hosia