Navigation for Windows On The World

Copyright restrictions prevent us from making these programmes available as audio on demand or podcasts.

Monday 26 February - Her Story Made History #3 of 5

On the 100th anniversary of the first time British women won the vote, Lyse Doucet travels across the globe, meeting women from Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, Liberia and Iceland to discover that the victory of 1918 in Britain has continued to resonate through the century. She hears reflections from some of the world’s most influential women’s rights activists, including former presidents, and shares her own experiences in reporting from some of the most troubled regions. This week Vigdis Finnbogadottir. In 1980, the tiny country of Iceland did something no other nation had done. They elected a female head of state. Lyse Doucet travels to Reykjavik to meet Vigdis Finnbogadottir. Now 87, she was president for exactly 16 years and remains the longest-serving elected female head of state of any country to date. "That’s what I have given to the girls of this country," she says: “If she can, I can.”

Tuesday 27 February - Japan: New Ways to Grow Old #1 of 2.

Japan has the fastest ageing society in the world with more than a quarter of its population over the age of 65. It currently has 66,000 centenarians, more than any other country. Toshiko Katayose and Aki Maruyama Leggett explore some of the innovative ways in which Japanese people are adapting to living longer in the first of a two part series. 

Wednesday 28 February - Eating Blockchain  
Blockchain technology has been heralded as the answer to a safer, fairer and more transparent food system. Many companies, from global food giants, to start-ups have begun to experiment with it. But can blockchain really disrupt the global food industry or is it just a gimmick? Emily Thomas meets some pioneers of this new technology, who think it will change the way we eat.

Thursday 1 March - History of Lead

From the plumbing of ancient Rome, to lead acid batteries, paint, petrol and a dangerous legacy, the metal lead has seen a myriad of uses and abuses over thousands of years.  However it's only recently that the serious impact of lead poisoning on the development of children's brains has come to light. Uta Frith, Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Development at University College London, who studied the impact of lead poisoning in the 1970s and 80s, journeys with lead from the iron age to the present day delving into the history and scandal associated with this often overlooked element.