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Monday 11 March: Priest and Psychotherapist, Father Bernard Lynch

The Catholic Church has been rocked by  two shock and surprise resignations. First, Pope Benedict  after announcing he was too old and infirm for the office. Then Britain's most senior Catholic, Cardinal Keith O'Brien, resigned after allegations - some of which he has admitted - of inappropriate behaviour towards priests thirty years ago. His departure has once again put the spotlight on the Catholic Church's attitudes towards homosexuality. Zeinab Badawi speaks to Father Bernard Lynch, one of a few openly gay Catholic priests. How will the church recover from these embarrassing blows at a time of historic transition?

Tuesday 12 March: The Lebanese Message

Lebanese people will vote in a general election in June. Catholic Maronites make up just a quarter of the country, and by law the President has to be a Maronite, but the position of the Maronites in Lebanon is looking precarious with a feeling that there is a campaign to remove them from their historical home in the Levant. John Laurenson travels to Lebanon to discover its ancient and extraordinary Maronite Church and the hopes and fears of these Arab Catholics “afloat on a Muslim sea”.

Wednesday 13 March: Red Dirt Dreaming (Part 1 of 2)

Western Australia, larger than Western Europe in size, drives the Australian economy, but the centre of the boom, the heavily mined Pilbara and soon to be exploited Kimberley to the north, are among the last great wildernesses. The Aboriginal population negotiate constantly for what is called 'Native Title' over their lands, and thus the right to negotiate with mining companies for a share in their wealth. Before the mining boom this burning vastness was their last line of retreat but now they’ve been thrust into the front line of global economics and modernity. Some Aboriginal communities have come into many millions of dollars, others have nothing. The bitterness that results splits them apart.

In programme one Neil Trevithick and Kirsti Melville journey across the Kimberley to a pristine promontary called James Price Point 60km north of the small resort town of Broome.

Thursday 14 March: Red Dirt Dreaming (Part 2 of 2

Western Australia, larger than Western Europe in size, drives the Australian economy, but the centre of the boom, the heavily mined Pilbara and soon to be exploited Kimberley to the north, are among the last great wildernesses. The Aboriginal population negotiate constantly for what is called 'Native Title' over their lands, and thus the right to negotiate with mining companies for a share in their wealth. Before the mining boom this burning vastness was their last line of retreat but now they’ve been thrust into the front line of global economics and modernity. Some Aboriginal communities have come into many millions of dollars, others have nothing. The bitterness that results splits them apart.

In programme two Neil Trevithick and Kirsti Melville drive south from the Kimberley into the even-larger area of the Pilbara which has been heavily mined for more than 50 years.